Hoey Residence Hall

Appalachian State University's Hoey Residence Hall (soon to be renamed) is located on Hardin Street/U.S. 321.

BOONE — Appalachian State University and Appalachian District Health Department (AppHealthCare) announced Oct. 8 they are responding to four new COVID-19 clusters identified in university dorms.

A cluster is defined by the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services as a minimum of five cases with illness onsets or initial positive results within a 14-day period and plausible epidemiologic linkage between cases.

Currently, there are:

• 9 cases in Hoey residence hall. Six are recovering in active isolation and 3 are past the isolation stage. (Editor's note: The university announced earlier this year that Hoey would be renamed, but the university has not yet announced a new name).

• 6 cases in Gardner residence hall. Three are recovering in active isolation and 3 are past the isolation stage.

• 7 cases in Frank residence hall. Two are recovering in active isolation and 5 are past the isolation stage.

• 5 cases in Coltrane residence hall. Four are recovering in active isolation and 1 is past the isolation stage.

Additionally, there are four new positive cases associated with the active App State football team cluster: three staff and one student-athlete. Mountaineer football practice has been suspended, and App State’s football game at Georgia Southern, scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 14, has been postponed, the university said.

"AppHealthCare and App State have been providing support to the students and staff and have been working with them to continue to identify and reach out to all identified close contacts," the university stated. "A close contact is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as someone who has been within 6 feet of an infected person for more than 15 minutes."

App State will hold a pop-up testing event this Saturday, Oct. 10, in the Rivers Street Parking Deck from noon-5 p.m. Students, faculty and staff can walk up or drive up for a free COVID-19 test. No appointments are required, but you will be asked to show your AppCard.

"AppHealthCare and App State encourage members of the university community to take advantage of these testing opportunities," the university said. "The more information we have, the better we are able to respond to active cases and help prevent the further spread of COVID-19."

AppHealthCare has been working closely with App State throughout the COVID-19 response, and continues to provide public health recommendations and guidance for infection and virus transmission prevention. AppHealthCare will closely monitor the active cases and continue to conduct response testing in coordination with App State.

Of the total active cases in App State students, 57 are in residence halls, representing about 1% of the population of students who live in residence halls. Currently, there are no confirmed cases of classroom transmission of the virus.

In some instances, the definition of a cluster is not met until after a number of the cases in the clusters are no longer active. This can be due to a variety of reasons, including the number of cases identified in a 14-day time period, contact tracing to identify and determine plausible epidemiologic linkage, and COVID testing and results.

"Responding to calls and inquiries from public health officials who are tracing close contacts is extremely important for a rapid response from AppHealthCare and App State," the organizations said.

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(9) comments

RightBehindYou

Shut this d*#n school down! It's affecting out whole town, and they have absolutely no control over what the students do off campus. Everts should be fired!

juliacallander@gmail.com

The Chancellor's email about this yesterday stated, "We are implementing mandatory, large-scale testing in residence halls with active clusters." This is blatantly untrue. I am faculty in residence in one of the dorms that has a cluster, and there is no such thing happening. Students are afraid to get tested because they don't want to spend two weeks at the Super 8. Even when students do try to get tested, the wait times at on-campus pop-up events are unbelievable; I think some folks waited in line for 2 hours this past Saturday.

Overall, I think the Watauga Democrat relies too much on official press releases from the university, which are often at odds with what is actually going on at ASU.

Wynd

The problem isn't the name of a building, it is that Covid cases are on the rise in our area - and a big part of that is the cases at App State. Test all they can, no one can make the students do the right thing - which IMO is to not congregate in any form...no parties, no in person classes, no sports.

andy@andybrowning.com

Why is hoey being renamed? Did they say the N-word when they were 12 or something? Bunch of liberal pansies.

thechaosaysmuuuu

Why are you like this? Who hurt you?

dummy@pcgeek.net

There you go. Get it all out. But hey, you should know it’s all coming to an end. He’s getting voted out and the senate is going to flip. Get used to progress. You can see it coming too, Andy. I can hear it in the desperate tone of your posts.

Citizen Truth

Oh please stop with the hysterical bleating. What is clear is that you ^^have an agenda against Everts and this administration.

thechaosaysmuuuu

/sarcasm, I hope?

yosefisdying@gmail.com

Prior to the semester, faculty and others repeatedly pressed Everts, Norris and team to set up a testing program. They refused, and justified their inaction by purposefully mischaracterizing CDC guidelines to fit their inaction. A purposeful (non)action of negligence. SO NOW they are saying: "App State encourages members of the university community to take advantage of these testing opportunities," the university said. "The more information we have, the better we are able to respond to active cases and help prevent the further spread of COVID-19." Just imagine how much was possible if we had information from a testing program from the start!! Other campuses acted in this way, but App failed and now they clearly admit it.

WD is repeating App's (purposeful) misleading claim of no confirmed cases of classroom transmission. Without testing, there is no way to confirm the classroom transmissions (that are certainly happening). They don't test and then use the absence of results as some indicator things are going well. Come on. There's been enough cases to know that there is NO contact tracing going on. There is no testing, tracing or communication to classes about positive cases in class.

And clearly, App has tried to shift as much of the effort and responsibility to AppHealthcare. What a horrible thing to do. Bring in 20k students, doubling the number of people in town and creating a hot zone of COVID cases...and then place the burden on local services to deal with the clusters and tracing. The administration has exhibited absolutely no competency, concern, effort or leadership. They have failed App and Boone.

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